Monthly Archives: May 2014

History of the Postal Service in Guyana

 Postal Service-1

History of the Postal Service in Guyana

 By Dmitri Allicock

The French during their occupation in 1782 established the first postal service in historical Guyana. ‘They announced that a ship will sail for France eight or ten times every year by which anyone can send a letter to other countries.

With the dawn of this age of instant internet communication and gadgetry it is easy to forget centuries of the Postal Service of Guyana which was once regarded as an essential instrument of nation building that adapted very well to serve alongside radio, telegraph, telephone and changing technology.    Continue reading

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The 1836 British Guiana Bank now Republic Bank Ltd

THE 1836 BRITISH GUIANA BANK NOW REPUBLIC BANK LTD

THE 1836 BRITISH GUIANA BANK NOW REPUBLIC BANK LTD

By Dmitri Allicock

The history of commercial banking in Guyana originated in 1836 when British Guiana opened on November 11, in the capital city of Georgetown, the British Guiana Bank, a journey spanning 178 years of service with local ownership to foreign ownership then, full circle, to local ownership again. It was the first commercial bank owned by the private sector to start business in the colony of British Guiana, which had recently consolidated, in 1831, the three colonies of Essequibo, Berbice and Demerara into one entity.

Business commenced in Georgetown on February 16, 1837 and in New Amsterdam on March 06, 1837. Prior to this establishment the economy of the country was not conducive to banking as both external and internal trade was largely on a barter basis. Many products such as tobacco, sugar, coffee and rum, were used in exchange for other goods. Money was not yet accepted as a medium of exchange.  Continue reading

War memorial THE 1923 WAR MEMORIAL OF GUYANA

War memorial

THE 1923 WAR MEMORIAL OF GUYANA

-Devotion, Humanity, Fortitude, and Sacrifice-

The Georgetown Cenotaph is a war memorial in Georgetown, Guyana, located at the junction of Main and Church Streets. The Cenotaph was unveiled on August 14, 1923, by the then Governor, Graeme Thomson, and the first Armistice Day observance took place at the Church Street Monument on 11 November 1923.

In 1917 the Mayor of Georgetown started a campaign for the erection in the city of a monument to Lord Kitchener to be a memorial to those who died in the war. A Kitchener Memorial Fund was started on February 3, in 1917 and was advertised in the newspapers. Continue reading

HISTORICAL HOTEL ADS OF EARLY GUYANA

High Street

High Street, Georgetown 1900

HISTORICAL HOTEL ADS OF EARLY GUYANA

A picture may paint a thousand words but ads written from over a century ago lend a kind of majesty to that vintage age of early Guyana and capture so well the essence and that flavor of passing time.

For the travelers of British Guiana in the late 1800s and early 1900s these historical hotel’s advertisements served the practical purposes for lodging and comfort away from home. Hotels would have provided basic accommodation, a room with bed, a cupboard, a small table, washstand and cutting edge technology of electrical lighting plus furnishing like a billiard table, drawing and stylish dining room for passengers arriving by steamer.   Continue reading

THE 1909 NATIONAL LIBRARY OF GUYANA

THE 1909 NATIONAL LIBRARY OF GUYANA

Library

 By Dmitri Allicock

“The only thing that you absolutely have to know is the location of the library.”
 Albert Einstein

The National Library of Guyana formerly known as the Carnegie Free Library, the Georgetown Free Public Library and the Free Public Library, is the legal deposit and copyright library for Guyana.

Unlike many national libraries, it is also a public lending library and the headquarters of Guyana’s public library service, with branches extending throughout the country. Founded in 1909, the National Library of Guyana is situated on the corner of Church Street and Main Street in central Georgetown.    Continue reading

A Propose Metro Light Rail for Guyana – By Dmitri Allicock

A Propose Metro Light Rail for Guyana

By Dmitri Allicock

The close relationship between railways and the genera of development is distinctly defined by the prosperity and success that they brought throughout the globe.

GT transit sytemA group of young enterprising Guyanese based in both the USA and Guyana and associated with the University of Guyana has been trying to promote the idea of a Georgetown Light Rail Project that would ease the congestion of traffic, providing efficient, safe travel and the restoration of the garden city that Georgetown once was. A great idea for growth and development to accompany the rapidly growing capital and the modernization of Guyana was listed in the group’s proposal.

About the project:  The Georgetown, Guyana Light Rail Transit Project will create a light rail alignment that would travel an anticipated amount of miles, connecting  University of Guyana students, as well as the working class teens, children, adults and tourist of the city.   Continue reading

Steamers of British Guiana – By Dmitri Allicock

Sprostons Dry Dock of October 26, 1867

Sprostons Dry Dock of October 26, 1867

Steamers of British Guiana

And so have disappeared over the horizon that regal age of the Steamers of Guyana, what some of us might have experienced and also what our fore-parents spoke so fondly of.

By Dmitri Allicock

The cautious introduction of steam propulsion to vessels in British Guiana brought the golden age of sailing ships and the reliance on the currents of the wind to an end in the 1800s and launched an era of both commercial and passenger steamships in early Guyana.

The steamer service in Guyana dates back to the early 19th century when the colonial government contracted a few privately-owned steamers to provide transportation for commuters and for shipping of produce.
The first official documentation of a steamer service can be traced to the establishment of a Local Steamer Navigation Company, which appears to have been founded in 1825. This company commenced operations in 1826 with the Cambria, an immigrant ship, which was purchased for the sum of $50,000.  Continue reading